Tukuk (Sea Lion)
Ron Hamilton

"This is the third of the sea creature series. This story comes from the Hiikulthaht tribe in Barclay Sound, my mother’s home country.
The print illustrates a version of a story that I heard from my aunt at Aktiis. Originally, there was only one sea lion, Tukuk, and a man who regularly went out to harpoon that sea lion. He used to bring in Tukuk, feed his people, save all the bones and throw them back into the sea. Later, he would go back and harpoon it again.
One time, the man went out and once again Tukuk was swimming beside the canoe and as the man stood up to club him this time, he slipped on the fish slime on the bottom of the canoe and he fell overboard. The sea lion swallowed him and became pregnant. It gave birth to four children, two male and two female. These four sea lions were the ancestors of the sea lions you see up and down the coast today.”
-Ron Hamilton (Kwayatsapalth)

Tukuk (Sea Lion)

Ron Hamilton

"This is the third of the sea creature series. This story comes from the Hiikulthaht tribe in Barclay Sound, my mother’s home country.

The print illustrates a version of a story that I heard from my aunt at Aktiis. Originally, there was only one sea lion, Tukuk, and a man who regularly went out to harpoon that sea lion. He used to bring in Tukuk, feed his people, save all the bones and throw them back into the sea. Later, he would go back and harpoon it again.

One time, the man went out and once again Tukuk was swimming beside the canoe and as the man stood up to club him this time, he slipped on the fish slime on the bottom of the canoe and he fell overboard. The sea lion swallowed him and became pregnant. It gave birth to four children, two male and two female. These four sea lions were the ancestors of the sea lions you see up and down the coast today.”

-Ron Hamilton (Kwayatsapalth)